GRRRL TALK

Saturday, March 30

  • 4,909 notes
moderngirlblitz:

thearcanetheory:

jayaprada:

Chicago Students Protest in Support of Persepolis 
There’s a reason behind the banning. American chauvinists do not want the working class and the people to know the reality behind the revolutionary movement in Iran. The book does a great job in visualizing the Iranian left during the 1979 revolution. The banning of the book dehumanizes the essential meaning of education and wants to advocate a Orientalist perspective of the state post-revolution. Banning this book can make it easier for the imperialists to invade the country for ‘humanitarian reasons’. The book does a great job in depicting the brutality behind the Shah regime and the ban just simply neglects the prospects behind the revolution. 

FUCK ORIENTALISM
what the fuck is wrong with Persepolis?!
Oh yeah, it shows Iran and Iranians in a human light instead of evil big baddie foreigners who want to destroy us all
bye

People are seriously trying to ban Persepolis? What the actual fuck

moderngirlblitz:

thearcanetheory:

jayaprada:

Chicago Students Protest in Support of Persepolis

There’s a reason behind the banning. American chauvinists do not want the working class and the people to know the reality behind the revolutionary movement in Iran. The book does a great job in visualizing the Iranian left during the 1979 revolution. The banning of the book dehumanizes the essential meaning of education and wants to advocate a Orientalist perspective of the state post-revolution. Banning this book can make it easier for the imperialists to invade the country for ‘humanitarian reasons’. The book does a great job in depicting the brutality behind the Shah regime and the ban just simply neglects the prospects behind the revolution. 

FUCK ORIENTALISM

what the fuck is wrong with Persepolis?!

Oh yeah, it shows Iran and Iranians in a human light instead of evil big baddie foreigners who want to destroy us all

bye

People are seriously trying to ban Persepolis? What the actual fuck

Wednesday, March 20

  • 1,617 notes

Sunday, March 10

  • 8,680 notes

To put it simply, I AM TIRED OF TRYING TO EXPLAIN THIS SHIT TO PEOPLE WHO DON’T WANT TO HEAR IT. Especially “jokes” like MacFarlane’s, which, to the layperson’s ear, barely register above microaggressions (if the kind of people who see no problem whatsoever with “We Saw Your Boobs” were the kind of people who used the term “microaggressions”). I am tired of trying to have an intellectual discussion about dog-whistle sexism in a culture where prominent politicians are still trying to grasp what rape is, and in a world where little girls are shot in the head because they want to go to school. Asking people to think critically about some hacky jokes from a dancing cartoonist? You might as well wear a sandwich board that says, “Yell at Me With Bad Grammar.”

I am tired of being called a shrieking harridan for pointing out inequalities so tangible and blatant that they are regularly codified into law. I am tired of being told to provide documentation of inequality in the comments sections of a website where a staff of smart women documents inequality as fast as our fingers can move. Like, you might as well write me a note on a banana peel demanding that I prove to you that bananas exist. I am tired of being asked to “cite sources” proving that sexism is real (that RAPE is real, even!), because there is no way to concisely cite decades and decades of rigorous academia. Allow me to point at the fucking library. We can’t cite “everything,” and our challengers know that. It’s an insulting diversionary tactic, it’s an attempt to drag us all backwards, and fuck it. Do your own research like the rest of the grown-ups.

Lindy West, “Sexism Fatigue: When Seth MacFarlane Is a Complete Ass and You Don’t Even Notice” on Jezebel.

PREACH!

(via cognitivedissonance)

All hail THE QUEEN

xAA

(via rookiemag)

(via rookiemag)

  • 1,757 notes
lucyknisley:

kazmahoney:

Happy International Women’s Day!
[Illustration: Wonder Women by Lucy Knisley)

I love that people still love this. Maybe I’ll update it! It’s pretty awesome as it is, though, if I do say so myself.

lucyknisley:

kazmahoney:

Happy International Women’s Day!

[Illustration: Wonder Women by Lucy Knisley)

I love that people still love this. Maybe I’ll update it! It’s pretty awesome as it is, though, if I do say so myself.

(via illustratedladies)

  • 9 notes

Women vs Tropes In Video Games

raygungoth:

Damsel in Distress part 1 by Anita Sarkeesian

  • 2 notes

Sunday, January 6

  • 2,968 notes
avoir-une-faim-de-loup:

This is Dot Smith, the famous female stunt rider from the 1930s and 40s, she was a member of the San Francisco Motorcycle Club and a founding member of the iconic “Motor Maids” with Dot Robinson and Linda Degeau.
In this photograph she’s sitting on her 1937 EL Knucklehead and looking damn near perfect with that little ribbon in her hair.

avoir-une-faim-de-loup:

This is Dot Smith, the famous female stunt rider from the 1930s and 40s, she was a member of the San Francisco Motorcycle Club and a founding member of the iconic “Motor Maids” with Dot Robinson and Linda Degeau.

In this photograph she’s sitting on her 1937 EL Knucklehead and looking damn near perfect with that little ribbon in her hair.

(via gingerhaze)

Saturday, January 5

  • 1,329 notes
womenwhokickass:

Sir Lady Java: Why she kicks ass
She was a  trans civil rights warrior and popular illusionist, whose act consisted of singing, impersonations, and exotic dancing. As she said in the article about her performing for her idol, the late Lena Horne, “Lena is one of the three ladies I pattern my act after. I try to look like Lena, walk like Mae West and dress like Josephine Baker.” 
She was known as the ‘Prettiest Man on Earth’ for her natural 38-24-38 curves. 
Los Angeles had an anti-crossdressing regulation called Rule Number 9, which made it illegal for performers to ‘impersonate by means of costume or dress a member of the opposite sex’ unless they had a special permit issued by the LA Board of Police Commissioners. The LAPD decided to target the bars where illusionists worked, namely Sir Lady Java who had been working in the Los Angeles area for two years, and they told the principal owner of the club that if Lady Java appeared on the Redd Foxx club stage they would lose their license. Her act was dropped, and then she fought back. Rule Number 9 messed with Lady Java’s civil rights and her ability to get paid, so she teamed up with the ACLU (already immersed in civil rights legal work) and fought Rule Number 9. (The Rule was eventually removed, through her work, and the work of others. People owe a lot to her incessant fight.)
She kept up the pressure by initiating a highly publicized October 21 rally which featured 25 people picketing outside the Redd Foxx Club, which got mentioned in the LA Advocate and the November 16, 1967 issue of JET magazine.

womenwhokickass:

Sir Lady Java: Why she kicks ass

  • She was a  trans civil rights warrior and popular illusionist, whose act consisted of singing, impersonations, and exotic dancing. As she said in the article about her performing for her idol, the late Lena Horne, “Lena is one of the three ladies I pattern my act after. I try to look like Lena, walk like Mae West and dress like Josephine Baker.” 
  • She was known as the ‘Prettiest Man on Earth’ for her natural 38-24-38 curves. 
  • Los Angeles had an anti-crossdressing regulation called Rule Number 9, which made it illegal for performers to ‘impersonate by means of costume or dress a member of the opposite sex’ unless they had a special permit issued by the LA Board of Police Commissioners. The LAPD decided to target the bars where illusionists worked, namely Sir Lady Java who had been working in the Los Angeles area for two years, and they told the principal owner of the club that if Lady Java appeared on the Redd Foxx club stage they would lose their license. Her act was dropped, and then she fought back. Rule Number 9 messed with Lady Java’s civil rights and her ability to get paid, so she teamed up with the ACLU (already immersed in civil rights legal work) and fought Rule Number 9. (The Rule was eventually removed, through her work, and the work of others. People owe a lot to her incessant fight.)
  • She kept up the pressure by initiating a highly publicized October 21 rally which featured 25 people picketing outside the Redd Foxx Club, which got mentioned in the LA Advocate and the November 16, 1967 issue of JET magazine.

(via project-babe)

Sunday, December 30

  • 80 notes

Saturday, December 15

  • 328,806 notes

(Source: amajor7, via lacigreen)